Beware of the Small-world, neuroscientist!

D. Papo, M. Zanin,  J.H. Martínezand J.M. Buldúconn

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 10:96 (2016).

Whether or not the brain is indeed a SW network is still very much an open question. The question that we address is of a pragmatical rather than an ontological nature: independently of whether the brain is a SW network or not, to what extent can neuroscientists using standard system-level neuroimaging techniques interpret the SW construct in the context of functional brain networks? In a typical experimental setting, neuroscientists record brain images, define nodes and links, construct a network, extract its topological properties, to finally assess their statistical significance and their possible functional meaning. We review evidence showing that behind each of these stages lurk fundamental technical, methodological or theoretical stumbling blocks that render the experimental quantification of the SW structure and its interpretation in terms of information processing problematic, questioning its usefulness as a descriptor of global brain organization. The emphasis is on functional brain activity reconstructed using standard system-level brain recording techniques, where the SW construct appears to be the most problematic.

[Read more in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience]     [arXiv]

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Functional brain networks: great expectations, hard times, and the big leap forward

D. Papo, M. Zanin, J.A. Pineda-Pardo, S. Boccaletti, and J.M. Buldúconn

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 369:20130525 (2014).

Many physicasample_cover PTRSBl and biological systems can be studied using complex network theory, a new statistical physics understanding of graph theory. The recent application of complex network theory to the study of functional brain networks generated great enthusiasm as it allows addressing hitherto non-standard issues in the field, such as efficiency of brain functioning or vulnerability to damage. However, in spite of its high degree of generality, the theory was originally designed to describe systems profoundly different from the brain. We discuss some important caveats in the wholesale application of existing tools and concepts to a field they were not originally designed to describe. At the same time, we argue that complex network theory has not yet been taken full advantage of, as many of its important aspects are yet to make their appearance in the neuroscience literature. Finally, we propose that, rather than simply borrowing from an existing theory, functional neural networks can inspire a fundamental reformulation of complex network theory, to account for its exquisitely complex functioning mode.

[Read more in Philosophical Transactions]    [Read more in ArXiv]       [Read interview in Phil. Trans Blog]    [Listen to podcast in Nature]