Brain synchronizability, a false friend

D. Papo and J.M. Buldú

arXiv:1806.01597

conn

Synchronization plays a fundamental role in healthy cognitive and motor function. However, how synchronization depends on the interplay between local dynamics, coupling and topology and how prone to synchronization a network with given topological organization is are still poorly understood issues. To investigate the synchronizability of both anatomical and functional brain networks various studies resorted to the Master Stability Function (MSF) formalism, an elegant tool which allows analysing the stability of synchronous states in a dynamical system consisting of many coupled oscillators. Here, we argue that brain dynamics does not fulfil the formal criteria under which synchronizability is usually quantified and, perhaps more importantly, what this measure itself quantifies refers to a global dynamical condition that never holds in the brain (not even in the most pathological conditions), and therefore no neurophysiological conclusions should be drawn based on it. We discuss the meaning of synchronizability and its applicability to neuroscience and propose alternative ways to quantify brain networks synchronization.

[Read more in arXiv]

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“Neurofeedback: principles, appraisal and outstanding issues“

D. Papo  

arXiv:1805.05303

Neurofeedback is a form of brain training in which subjects are fed back information about some measure of their brain activity which they are instructed to modify in a way Avatar Invthought to be functionally advantageous. Over the last twenty years, NF has been used to treat various neurological and psychiatric conditions, and to improve cognitive function in various contexts. However, in spite of a growing popularity, NF protocols typically make (often covert) assumptions on what aspects of brain activity to target, where in the brain to act and how, which have far-reaching implications for the assessment of its potential and efficacy. Here we critically examine some conceptual and methodological issues associated with the way NF’s general objectives and neural targets are defined. The neural mechanisms through which NF may act at various spatial and temporal scales, and the way its efficacy is appraised are reviewed, and the extent to which NF may be used to control functional brain activity discussed. Finally, it is proposed that gauging NF’s potential, as well as assessing and improving its efficacy will require better understanding of various fundamental aspects of brain dynamics and a more precise definition of functional brain activity and brain-behaviour relationships.

[Read more in arXiv]

Brain temperature: what it means and what it can do for (cognitive) neuroscientists

David PapoAvatar Inv

arXiv:1310.2906v1 (2013).

The effects of temperature on various aspects of neural activity from single cell to neural circuit level have long been known. However, how temperature affects the system-level of activity typical of experiments using non-invasive imaging techniques, such as magnetic brain imaging of electroencephalography, where neither its direct measurement nor its manipulation are possible, is essentially unknown. Starting from its basic physical definition, we discuss
possible ways in which temperature may be used both as a parameter controlling the evolution of other variables through which brain activity is observed, and as a collective variable describing brain activity. On the one hand, temperature represents a key control parameter of brain phase space navigation. On the other hand, temperature is a quantitative measure of the relationship between spontaneous and evoked brain activity, which can be used to describe how brain activity deviates from thermodynamic equilibrium. These two aspects are further illustrated in the case of learning-related brain activity, which is shown to be reducible to a purely thermally guided phenomenon. The phenomenological similarity between brain activity and amorphous materials suggests a characterization of plasticity of the former in terms of the well-studied temperature and thermal history dependence of the latter, and of individual differences in learning capabilities as material-specific properties. Finally, methods to extract a temperature from experimental data are reviewed, from which the whole brain’s thermodynamics can then be reconstructed.

[Read more in ArXiv]